Interactive Resources

Explore interactive resources that help students learn about the principles of glass. Please note the activities requires Flash to play. Flash is being phased out on most modern browsers and may not work.

A graphic featuring a grey period table of elements in the background, with a colored stop light, glass beaker, and car light on top

Glass Chemistry Game

Discover the principles of glass chemistry. This interactive shows you how  glassmakers mix together ingredients to make what’s called “glass batch” and allows you to explore what mixing certain elements together can do.  The basic ingredients of glass are elements found on the periodic table: silicon dioxide (silica), sodium, and calcium.

Adding different elements can change the color and properties of the glass. For instance, iron can produce greens. Iron and sulfur can produce ambers and browns, copper can produce light blues, cobalt produces very dark blue, manganese can produce shades of amethyst color, tin can produce white, lead antimony can produce yellow and various metals produce reddish glasses.

Note: this interactive requires Flash to play. Flash is being phased out on most modern browsers and may not work.

A graphic featuring five circles of varying sizes with a dottted line through the middle, which explains how a telescope uses mirrors.

Telescope

Refracting telescopes use lenses to gather and concentrate light; reflecting telescopes use mirrors to gather light and lenses to create images. No lens can bring to focus all of the colors in white light, but a mirror can. Lenses absorb some of the light that passes through, thus weakening the image; mirrors have no such problem. Lenses can be made up to about 1 m in diameter; mirrors can be made much larger and more easily. After a mirror is ground and polished to a precise concave surface, it is coated with silver or aluminum, giving it a shiny, reflective finish. Reflecting telescopes are currently used for Earth-based and space-based observatories.

This interactive explores reflecting telescopes. The large glass mirrors of modern reflectors have opened our door to the universe — and, as telescopes grow larger, the door opens wider. Learn how telescopes work and see the universe through different sized lenses.

This interact requires Flash to play. Flash is being phased out on most modern browsers and may not work.